Anonymous 01/17/2021 (Sun) 18:36:55 No.21087 del
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The Rise of Bonbibonkers: An Essay by Seth Waters

I first saw you doing your puppet show in New York City. At the time, I didn't really know what to make of it. I mean, puppets? Come on.
But something about it really resonated with me. Maybe it was the idea that these inanimate objects were coming to life. Or maybe it was the idea that they weren't very nice. I dunno.
But the image that has stuck with me for all these years is when the Devil puppet ultimately eats Bob.
It was a nice twist. I appreciated that.
The next time I saw you, you were working on your first full-length puppet musical, Little Red Riding Hood: A Story of a Puppet. It was then that I got to know you a bit better.
You were very friendly. I remember asking you about the technical aspects of your show, and you answered every question I had. You were very knowledgeable about your craft, no doubt.
You were also somewhat cynical of the business. You mentioned your issues with getting Bob to move fluidly (which I understand all too well). You also mentioned an issue you were having with the music (and I don't just mean that song, which you didn't seem to care for).
"The music is crap," you said.
"How so?" I asked
"It's just not fitting for the play," you said. "It's supposed to be ominous, but it's coming off as silly. It's just not right."
I remember at the time thinking to myself that you were just being hard on yourself. The song, while a bit whimsical for your play, wasn't that bad.
Weeks later, I heard the entire play, and you were right. It wasn't that bad, but it certainly wasn't good. The music didn't fit at all.
Then your show closed.

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