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News & Current Events + Happenings
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Silly bitch admits face masks are not for protection Government illusion of safety 05/19/2020 (Tue) 19:41:03 Id: 2a16cd [Preview] No. 15948
[First I'm going to explain something before posting the article. The average fabric density of cloth is 1.5 grams per cubic centimeter and with cloth you're going to absorb virus particles. 10,000 micrometers are in a centimeter. Covid-19 particles hang in the air for up to 3 hours and are between .08 to .14 of a micrometer. These will get through your masks, either exhaling or inhaling.]

"Wearing a face mask won't prevent you from getting coronavirus, but it may give you some peace of mind."
Earlier this year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a warning guide to Americans that the coronavirus outbreak was fast approaching. This news caused face mask sales to skyrocket, despite the fact that wearing one probably won't protect you from contracting the illness. Of course, it's considered a social norm in some cultures to wear a face mask somewhat regularly. In China, Japan, and South Korea, face masks may be worn to reduce risks associated with air pollution. They may also be worn as a way to protect others from illness in collectivist cultures. Yet more and more people are walking around wearing face masks, even as suppliers increase the prices. So why do so many people want to cover up their faces if it doesn't help? It actually has more to do with their mental health than their physical health.

We grow comfortable with the risks we take on a regular basis. Perhaps you drive your car every day. You likely don't feel scared when you get behind the wheel. You might even reply to text messages occasionally or forget to buckle up when driving. But according to statistics, driving a car is a big risk. You have about a one in 103 chance of dying in a car crash. It just doesn't feel scary because it's a familiar risk you take. The coronavirus isn't familiar. So you're uncomfortable with the risk of contracting it, and possibly dying from it. You likely have a bigger fear of it than of crashing your car. Media consumption also fuels fears. Whether scrolling through social media or flipping through channels, reports about death tolls and the speed at which coronavirus is spreading are everywhere. The more content consumed, the more likely you are to overestimate chances of contracting the coronavirus — and the more likely your anxiety levels will skyrocket.

When we feel anxious about something, we become desperate to gain some sense of control over the situation. It's a phenomenon psychologists call the "illusion of control." And research shows we often make strange decisions based on our perceived level of control. For example, research shows most people think they are less likely to get into an accident when driving a car, as opposed to being the passenger. Being in the driver's seat makes people think they can prevent accidents — even though it doesn't really guarantee this at all. Similarly, studies also show that people think they have a better chance of winning the lottery when they pick their own numbers, as opposed to allowing the computer to pick for them. Even though the numbers are drawn randomly, people are more likely to assume that having more control (picking their own numbers) increases their chances of success.

When it comes to the coronavirus, most of us likely feel we have little control over whether we contract it. And little is known about what might happen if we get it. Wearing a face mask is one way to convince ourselves that we have some control over it. We tell ourselves, "Wearing this mask decreases my chances of getting sick." This, in turn, reduces our anxiety. Rather than idly waiting for something bad to happen, we feel better if we take some sort of action. Even if the action isn't helpful, we have a way of fooling ourselves into believing that our behavior has control over the outcome. Interestingly, research also reveals the tendency to overcompensate when there are "safeguards" in place.

https://www.businessinsider.com/face-masks-wont-help-avoid-illness-so-why-wear-them-mental-health#we-overcompensate-when-safeguards-are-in-place-3
http://archive.is/j8ZVZ
Edited last time by AdolfHitler on 05/22/2020 (Fri) 00:48:53.


Reader 05/19/2020 (Tue) 19:46:53 Id: 2a16cd [Preview] No.15949 del
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Studies have shown that people are more likely to speed when wearing seatbelts. And insurance companies have even discovered that drivers actually become more reckless when there are more safety features on a car. This mentality may be one reason why so many people wearing face masks could even be detrimental in certain ways. They have convinced themselves that their face masks will protect them. So rather than reducing contact with the public as is suggested, people who are wearing face masks may actually become more likely to travel or interact with people.
The herd mentality is real
— and research shows that most of us jump on bandwagons. So the more you see other people wearing a face mask, the more likely you are to put one on. Researchers have known for a long time that people are susceptible to "behavioral mimicry," meaning we're quick to copy those around us. So whether you're walking through a marketplace, riding the subway, or sitting on a plane, the more people you see wearing face masks, the more likely you are to convince yourself that you should wear one, too. Not wearing one might even cause you to feel anxious. The mask-wearers are more visible than people who are taking recommended precautions (washing their hands more often and limiting travel). This can cause you to assume everyone is wearing a mask.
It reduces our anxiety
Most of us equate anxiety with risk level. If we feel really anxious, we reason that something must be really risky. And if we can reduce that anxiety, we'll convince ourselves that the level of risk we face is somehow lower. So even though we've been warned that wearing a face mask might be a bad idea, doing so might still have the effect of reducing anxiety. While it's up to you whether you decide to wear a mask, consider why you're doing it. Even though medical professionals might warn against it, you might find it gives you a little peace of mind — which isn't necessarily a bad thing.

-Huggy McFeels quack therapist Amy Morin reports


Reader 05/19/2020 (Tue) 19:54:40 Id: 2a16cd [Preview] No.15950 del
Here is the source for the size of Coronavirus particles: https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/85814
http://archive.is/jY51F A South Korean study that found the virus gets through masks


Reader 05/20/2020 (Wed) 04:08:35 Id: 259d68 [Preview] No.15951 del
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Share on all social media accounts you have.


Reader 05/22/2020 (Fri) 00:53:42 Id: 259d68 [Preview] No.15954 del
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There was a typo where I didn't state 1.5 grams per cubic centimeter on the average fabric density of cloth. It's fixed now.


Reader 05/26/2020 (Tue) 19:05:41 [Preview] No.15960 del
Face mask protects you from facial recognition cameras.


Reader 06/06/2020 (Sat) 08:27:43 [Preview] No.15999 del
I thought everyone in the world knew this already; its plastered on every youtube video concerning the use of face masks. We wear face masks because it tells others that we are at least taking some precautions in preventing the people around us from getting the virus. This helps others trust us more. Course there are more ways to spread the virus but with how easy it is to transfer illnesses through saliva I would rather have the people around me covered.
Not too sure about how reliable face masks are from preventing the people around you from getting sick, but personally I use an industry grade face mask from my last chemical engineering job.


Reader 06/06/2020 (Sat) 11:06:05 Id: b8a318 [Preview] No.16000 del
(22.38 MB 1920x1080 Just a flu bro.webm)
>>15999
>Not too sure about how reliable face masks are from preventing the people around you from getting sick
0%. They're illusions of safety. Virologists wear full environment suits when dealing with deadly viruses for a reason. https://www.medpagetoday.com/infectiousdisease/covid19/85814
"The authors pointed to earlier research showing particles 0.04 to 0.2 μm "can penetrate surgical masks." For the coronavirus responsible for SARS, particles were estimated to be within that range at 0.08 to 0.14 μm, they said." (μm = micrometer) That means SARS-CoV-2 particles are between 8/100ths to 14/100ths of a single micrometer. Saliva particles begin at 0.06 of micrometer, that is 6/100ths and up. Every saliva particle above 0.08 will penetrate those masks.
https://www.acpjournals.org/doi/10.7326/M20-1342
"The median viral loads after coughs without a mask, with a surgical mask, and with a cotton mask were 2.56 log copies/mL, 2.42 log copies/mL, and 1.85 log copies/mL, respectively. All swabs from the outer mask surfaces of the masks were positive for SARS–CoV-2, whereas most swabs from the inner mask surfaces were negative" + "Neither surgical nor cotton masks effectively filtered SARS–CoV-2 during coughs by infected patients."
Clearly, 4/100ths to 20/100ths of a micrometer can penetrate surgical masks. Coffee filters filter 20 microns and up. Dishtowels/washcloths filter 60% of 10/100ths of a micron and up, leaving 40% you're taking in. Average T-shirt cloth filters 30% of airborne particles 50 microns and higher. And >>15951 displays the common disposable masks provided by corporations which filter 3 microns+. Your natural mucociliary clearance filters 2.5 microns and above on it's own. Anything filtering above that amount is completely useless. Coffee filters, cloth masks, corporate provided disposable masks = pointless. They're placebos.


Reader 06/20/2020 (Sat) 02:16:49 Id: d55f45 [Preview] No.16021 del
>>15960
This is the only reason I wear one now, before it wasn't accepted.



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