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Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 00:14:34 [Preview] No. 11448 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
I'm looking to build a PC ($700 - 1000), and was wondering what would be a good build for gaming?
12 posts and 1 image omitted.


Anonymous 10/03/2017 (Tue) 12:16:21 [Preview] No. 11498 del
>>11497
Your post improved the quality


Anonymous 10/03/2017 (Tue) 16:14:00 [Preview] No. 11499 del
>>11498
back to lainchan


Anonymous 10/03/2017 (Tue) 18:58:58 [Preview] No. 11500 del
Summary of actual info in this thread:

1. pcpartpicker.com

2. tech contains hostile douchebags who need more bran in their diet

So, does an SSD actually make a damned bit of difference *during gameplay* for any popular games? If one doesn't give a shit about boot or load times, is skipping the SSD and going with the classic bigger, cheaper, mechanical hard drive in a gaming rig the way to go?


Anonymous 10/03/2017 (Tue) 19:30:32 [Preview] No. 11504 del
>>11500
Depends on your ram space and your setup. I don't think you get a choice on windows, but on GNU/Linux you can have no swap space in which case it makes no difference but you need enough RAM. Can also depend on the game with level loads. Short answer, it makes a difference. A noticeable difference? Depends.


Anonymous 10/17/2017 (Tue) 01:08:52 [Preview] No. 11567 del
It pretty depends on what type of games you play as you can save money here or there by buying specific parts that will be used heavily in those games. For example, if you like to play games like Total War, you might want to get a Ryzen 5 or 7 as the threading and price will help out immensely. Those games don't really put a dent in your GPU as much as other games. If you want to play FPS' in 4K or whatnot I'd recommend spending more on the GPU and sticking with a modern intel quad core and something like a 1070 or even a 1080 if you can manage.

Another thing. I'd recommend to get a small 80-120 gig SSD to store your OS and other files and go for a 50 buck 1tb hdd for your video games. Most video games will take a lot longer to load as you're moving the data off of the platter but if you have enough RAM to handle the game's cache you're A OK. Honestly anything over 8G is enough in terms of RAM. If you can squeeze it out try getting mid priced memory modules and overclock them just a bit from there. The reason you want 8 gigs or more is because games (and most programs now) often cache the game's files in memory directly as memory is the second fastest thing you can retrieve your delicious bits from (the next up being your CPU's caches).



OpenIKED vpn alternative Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 10:27:22 [Preview] No. 11471 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
What do you think of OpenIKED?
Is it a viable alternative to Openvpn?

http://www.openiked.org/
https://github.com/reyk/openiked
http://www.openbsd.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb/src/sbin/iked/
4 posts and 1 image omitted.


Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 18:44:47 [Preview] No. 11483 del
>>11482
define better**


Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 18:52:30 [Preview] No. 11486 del


Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 21:50:37 [Preview] No. 11488 del
See this: >>10608


Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 22:17:23 [Preview] No. 11489 del
>>11488
>See this: >>10608
Yes, and then read the rest of that thread so you can see what an idiot >>10608 is. Then realize that it would be pretty dumb to take security advice from someone who makes bold, unequivocal statements like he knows what he's talking about, then when he gets utterly blown the fuck out, falls back on "B-but I never said I was an expert, pls no bulli pls!!!!!"


Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 23:58:17 [Preview] No. 11491 del
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Learning Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 02:15:57 [Preview] No. 11454 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
How did/does everyone continue their learning endeavours? I think most of us are self-taught and autodidacts around here, but there might be some formally taught.

I recently found the joy of academic websites by professors. The first is a nice computer security basics for the stack and how to exploit it by Wenliang Du of Syracuse New York: http://www.cis.syr.edu/~wedu/education/buffer_overflow.html

If you mess around with the URL, you can traverse different directories and see more resources by him and his department. Of not is this page where he has labs and videos for OS sec and exploitation: http://www.cis.syr.edu/~wedu/education/

I've found myself greatly under-educated to understand some of the more advanced issues like injection and return-to-libc, but that is being remedied after I found MIT's open courseware: https://ocw.mit.edu/courses/electrical-engineering-and-computer-science/

There's a lot of courses with guidelines to learn specific topics that could be useful to patch up the holes in someone's knowledge. I know there isn't enough time in most of our lives, unless you're set and have the time which I would be jealous of, so it's imprudent to go at learning everything. I know I've skimmed the CS basics (6.00SC) to brush up what being a self-taught "coder" has left me wanting. A deeper look into recursion and algorithm times was cool, but I don't think it would be useful for anything at the current moment, so I've put it off into a "rainy day" tab to go back to whenever I don't have enough brain power to focus on pressing tasks, but don't want to waste the time on entertainment or idle tasks. Most of the undergraduate classes I believe have video lectures, which can be nice to just play on a mobile device and passively absorb too.

I found both links only by chance and using a proxy from a different country (American networks don't show edu sites as often?), but I can reproduce it on Google using "'TOPIC OF INTEREST' site:*.edu" where single quotes is just a string literal of interest and site portion specifics to return all sites that are .edu domains only.

It'd be best if you could share only things that were personally useful to you and how. There is too much stuff floating around and too little time to waste on personally verifying them.

On a more personal note, if anyone has sources for vulnerability research (exploitation development, assembly code auditing, etc.) I'd be grateful.


sage sage 10/02/2017 (Mon) 02:19:11 [Preview] No. 11457 del
Excuse my terrible formatting and extra picture.


Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 03:14:18 [Preview] No. 11458 del
>>11454
I took a programming class in college, but that is the extent of my formal education in /tech/ type subjects.

Later on, I learned Perl because I wanted to solve a math problem I saw in a science magazine. A computer wasn't necessary to solve it, but I didn't have the mathematical maturity to do it "the right way", so I had to brute force it instead. Thus, Perl. I used this tutorial: https://users.cs.cf.ac.uk/Dave.Marshall/PERL/

Most of my learning has been dictated by expediency. I don't think I've ever said to myself "I'm going to learn Python today." Rather, I have something I want to do, or a problem I want to solve, or something I want to automate, so I try to figure out from there how to go about getting it done.

When it involves learning timeless concepts, e.g. different types of algorithms or data structures, I'll often try to find a good book on the subject.

When it involves learning a new programming language, if the language itself is still in development, I shy away from using books, as they rapidly become outdated. In that case, I look for tutorials online that appear to still be maintained, or are part of the official project. But after having learned how to program in general, it's often more efficient to just refer to the documentation for the language (if it's good) and code examples. I never followed a Python tutorial or course, for example. I already knew Perl, so I just read the Python docs to figure out how to do what I wanted to do.

MOOCs and self-paced learning courses (the materials, anyway) of the sort offered by MIT could be a great resource for the right kind of person, but I don't have the discipline to do those.

Lecture-type videos can be good for somethings. I really don't care for screencast-type videos, however. I think those must be hard to do well.

So, for me, I tend to have a goal or task in mind, then I work backwards from that, figuring out what I need to do in order to reach that goal, then depending on what those things are, I look to different types of resources as appropriate. Might not work for everybody. Works okay for me.

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Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 18:27:00 [Preview] No. 11480 del
>>11458
>"the right way"
I remember in the 600SC course, the professor (Guttag) mentions that brute forcing is usually the "right" way to do maths problems in programming languages. I don't remember his reasoning but I think it was because all maths problems are just a bunch of smaller pieces glued together and you can break down and can be characterized as such in your programs, instead of the "elegant" but confusing one-liner.
>"expedency" + "self-paced" + "lecture" + "task"
I am the same. I've been trying the MOOCs and to build up a "foundation" but I feel bored out of my mind and whenever I try to learn something that's not immediately useful, I just glaze over the information. I know it's my ADD and I'm being subborn about it, but I'll have to work through the fact that I don't need to know everything to face a problem, even if it might be reckless. However, some topics don't lend well to being learned "as you go," and don't have texts as readily available as broader topics.
>"Violent Python"
I had the book saved from a bunch of torrents and repos I downloaded, but I decided against keeping it because, like many of the books I had downloaded, it focused too much on specific tools and cases, instead of the replicable theories behind the attacks.



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Realtime chinese surveillance system Anonymous 09/25/2017 (Mon) 18:06:25 [Preview] No. 11291 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
Scary shit:
https://twitter.com/0XDEDBEEF/status/912026226658652160

Remember to protect your privacy. Or, you can just keep listening to your Hardvapour/Fashvapour while everyone looses it's mind and... wait, what reality really is? You postmodernist degenerate fuck.
7 posts and 2 images omitted.


Anonymous 10/01/2017 (Sun) 13:48:17 [Preview] No. 11432 del
>>11292
>It's a shoop
Sure it is. Here is the actual product page: http://www.nec.com/en/global/solutions/safety/face_recognition/index.html


Anonymous 10/01/2017 (Sun) 15:46:17 [Preview] No. 11434 del
>>11292
>>11305
>Shoop
That image may be fabricated, but facial-recognition is very real technology.


Anonymous 10/01/2017 (Sun) 23:42:46 [Preview] No. 11444 del
>twitter

I saw the video featuring this pic (I don't remember when it's from). But it's not that serious.
You should be 2 hundreds time more concerned about US/Europe surveillance than China. Because China is doing the same mistake than communism: brute-force the problem.
Western system is far better engineered: they want to destroy the "questionable" content directly in your head. They want to create an anarchic bubble of chaotic information, so complicated that the common with little time can't detached the truth from the false. Moreover, they're stopping you to do effective research, by enclosing your view into a bubble as I said, who never challenge your believe.
One practical exemple, if you discovered the MK Ultra program, and other "complotist" thesis, you'll be direct to bullshit complotist theory, like Flat earth, or alien life (or other bullshit injected in the chaos of information). You'll be shamed by medias, even your families, see that there is no consequence to your act, so you'll drop the thing by yourself, or enclose you in ignorance (or view through the problem, but it takes time and books).
That's a far better system, because you don't know what is the problem. In China, everything that is banned is the problem. And at least, you know there is something wrong. Here, the mass, even though they have the feeling there is a lot of bullshit, don't even have the imagination or even just time/capabilities (the bubble) to swim in the anarchic internet infos.

Who cares about camera recognition in China. It's already here. And it's pretty irrelevant. The analysis of your whole internet history, will tell pretty accurately where you're heading. You search on your local train website to make itinerary? You search about vacation places? You have your phone on you?
These infos are available since a shit tone of time. Palantir (in-q-tel funded) process them.

I mean, it's like you never encountered /tech/nologies or got interested in modern surveillance.


Anonymous 10/01/2017 (Sun) 23:55:06 [Preview] No. 11445 del
You make AI image pattern recognition stronger every time you solve captcha. This is just the tip of the iceberg. Try mind reading and silent sound weaponry.

Mind encryption now (or this is the end).


Anonymous 10/02/2017 (Mon) 17:39:58 [Preview] No. 11479 del
>>11331
>look guys here I am, going through the city with IR blasters on my face blinding all those cameras all day, totally not suspicious rite
>what are those handcuffs for, officer?
>awww shit don't beat me I'm not a terrorist aah ah



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Degeneracy Anonymous 06/24/2017 (Sat) 01:17:52 [Preview] No. 8591 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
Now even lobste.rs(openbsd-like version of hackernews) fall into the idiocracy of battlestations, the last place I would like to watch this shit:
https://lobste.rs/s/uyw4pq/lobsters_battlestations_screenshots

Where are we going dudes? Fucks sake.
21 posts and 6 images omitted.


Anonymous 09/29/2017 (Fri) 08:44:28 [Preview] No. 11420 del
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>>11418
>Requesting change has never been how change is made
I'm not requesting. Please, point me where exactly where I've said that.
Suggesting is different from Requesting.

>>11419
>Now you know two more Latin words in addition to "ad homimem".
Oh, dear, you want to teach me logic fallacy now?
What I did was not ad populum.

This is an ad populum:

A is an individual argumenting about a point. B is a group. B agrees with the point, therefore A is right.


This is what I did:

Message too long. Click here to view full text.



Anonymous 09/29/2017 (Fri) 15:08:33 [Preview] No. 11421 del
>>11420
>I'm not requesting. Please, point me where exactly where I've said that.
>Suggesting is different from Requesting.
Then what's the point? Throwing it out there that you're sad because daddy beats you isn't gonna fix the problem. You either put in a request to ol Jimbob at the bar to teach him a lesson or lift and fuck him up yourself.


Anonymous 09/29/2017 (Fri) 22:06:21 [Preview] No. 11422 del
>>11421
>Then what's the point?
Discussion. I want people to critic, so we can get all the differents perspectives about the same problem.


Anonymous 09/29/2017 (Fri) 22:49:24 [Preview] No. 11423 del
>>11422
You're going all HN on me here. Discussion is a waste of time if it bares nothing practical.


Anonymous 10/01/2017 (Sun) 04:57:10 [Preview] No. 11431 del



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Anything interesting on EuroBSDCon? Anonymous 09/25/2017 (Mon) 17:20:04 [Preview] No. 11290 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
Anything new this year?
3 posts and 1 image omitted.


Anonymous 09/27/2017 (Wed) 01:08:20 [Preview] No. 11351 del
>>11339
Rip it and post it here.


Anonymous 09/30/2017 (Sat) 12:27:45 [Preview] No. 11424 del
deraadt talking about integration with pledge:
https://youtube.com/watch?v=fYgG0ds2_UQ


Anonymous 09/30/2017 (Sat) 21:39:51 [Preview] No. 11427 del
>>11424
Rip it and post it here.


Anonymous 09/30/2017 (Sat) 23:06:20 [Preview] No. 11428 del
>>11427
How about you contribute yourself?


Anonymous 10/01/2017 (Sun) 03:26:50 [Preview] No. 11430 del
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>>11424
>"We can't do this [pledge(2)] on firefox. It is this amorphous piece of ahhh... junk." - de Raadt, Theo.

It should go to theo.c right away:
http://cvsweb.openbsd.org/cgi-bin/cvsweb/src/usr.bin/mg/Attic/theo.c



Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 10:22:46 [Preview] No. 11399 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
Wanna have a bad day ?
Skim through some of these comments:
https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=15354114


Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 10:26:07 [Preview] No. 11400 del
At first I was angry, but then I just felt sad.


Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 10:52:55 [Preview] No. 11402 del
>Not if that data is encrypted with a key that they don***t have. Which is what Apple does.
huahuaha. Fuck. Why do this with us OP?
It's probably astroturfing/psyops, but it's really sad.

Besides that:
>prove you're legit
>google captcha

Let's have a consensus here: never share HN again, ok?

Here's better places to get news/information:

https://lobste.rs
https://soylentnews.org
https://undeadly.org
https://twitter.com/_cryptome_
https://twitter.com/matthew_d_green

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Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 15:17:03 [Preview] No. 11405 del
>>11399
First problem they made was vesting their trust in corporations.
Second mistake they made was believing they preserve their information and respect their privacy.

>Open Source does not automatically equal safe
They aren't wrong here, an open-source application or operating system has the potential to become malicious if the individual using is does not have access to a properly conducted audit or has not conducted an audit themselves. Using closed-source software is similar to drinking soda that does not have an ingredient list or hasn't been inspected by the FDA or a third party, an individual or corporation can tell you that the soda is perfectly safe and is similar to the open-source soda with the ingredients list visible and proper inspections, but you have to very much blindly follow their advice while deep inside, you have no idea what the closed-source soda is inflicting upon your body. This soda example is good, because it is not difficult for an individual to learn what each ingredient is and how it works together to make a food, and I know FOR A FACT that there would be a massive uproar if ingredients were no longer required to be listed, there already is a growing movement to push for labeling of genetically modified foods and pesticide usage, so it baffles me that the same people who use computers with closed-source software and proprietary hardware won't fight for better software and hardware, but will fight for better food and labeling, perhaps it is a hierarchy of desires, food of course is much more vital to ones life compared to a measly computer...

>They work hard to protect my information from external hackers, there have never been leaks
If it was easy for another corporation or hacker to steal users information from the company in question, they would no longer make profits selling the information heh. There is always the potential for a leak to occur, and when it does, you are entirely defenseless against it because "AS STATED IN PARAGRAPH 19821 OF OUR TERMS OF SERVICE, WE ARE NOT LIABLE FOR ANY DAMAGES OR LOSS OF PERSONAL INFORMATION".

They will protect your information from hackers and other corporations, but not from the fucking corporations buying it from them and the damn government.

>I have absolutely nothing to hide, the only people who care are schizophrenic gun-nuts who think the government is after them
Quite sad that these individuals are indirectly agreeing to be sold similar to cattle. "You use our software for free, and as payment we sell your information which you willingly give to us :^)" Nothing is free. This argument is also fucking retarded because most people HAVE committed actions that would destroy their reputation or instigate legal action if they were to be shown to the public, they would freak the fuck out if their address and personal information was posted on the front of google, and once again they would be defenseless because "When you upload, submit, store, send or receive content to or through our Services, you give Google (and those we work with) a worldwide license to use, host, store, reproduce, modify, create derivative works (such as those resulting from translations, adaptations or other changes we make so that your content works better with our Services), communicate, publish, publicly perform, publicly display and distribute such content :^)".

>They collect our information to make their services better and to cater to us, we only get the content we like to see!
This is how you subtly isolate each individual from each other, eliminate different views, cut the distribution of information, and keep individuals content so they remain docile. The inability to spend time searching for content one likes is a sign of laziness and incompetence, and refusing to adopt new views and look at content which makes you uncomfortable is ignorant.


Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 20:02:43 [Preview] No. 11407 del
>>11402
OP here,

I already know hn is shit. I visit it out of habit since from time to time I stumble upon gems or general linux/bsd news. I don't read the commends. I'm just interested in the link.

Appreciate the link dump.


Anonymous 09/30/2017 (Sat) 23:19:08 [Preview] No. 11429 del
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>>11405
>This is how you subtly isolate each individual from each other, eliminate different views, cut the distribution of information, and keep individuals content so they remain docile. The inability to spend time searching for content one likes is a sign of laziness and incompetence, and refusing to adopt new views and look at content which makes you uncomfortable is ignorant.
this



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New Xiph sound noise suppression Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 21:19:32 [Preview] No. 11410 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
>This demo presents the RNNoise project, showing how deep learning can be applied to noise suppression. The main idea is to combine classic signal processing with deep learning to create a real-time noise suppression algorithm that's small and fast. No expensive GPUs required - it runs easily on a Raspberry Pi. The result is much simpler (easier to tune) and sounds better than traditional noise suppression systems (been there!).

https://people.xiph.org/~jm/demo/rnnoise/



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WWW alternatives Anonymous 09/19/2017 (Tue) 19:57:00 [Preview] No. 11206 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
With W3C now folding to DRM and the web already being crushed under the weight of JS I think we need a discussion.

What are some alternatives to the web? I remember GNUNET implements something like websites. Basically I think we should ditch web browsers all together. BBS? Gopher?
44 posts and 9 images omitted.


Anonymous 09/27/2017 (Wed) 20:35:15 [Preview] No. 11380 del
>>11378
>mesh
Yes.
>hardware backdoors
Yes, that's another problem. This could be solved with RISC-V system on chip. The wireless device could be DASH7. Could also have a simple faraday cage, so government can't find it with EM detector, if we put it on some random place.
http://heshamelmatary.blogspot.com.au/2017/06/sel4testrisc-v-unofficial-release-priv.html
http://www.lowrisc.org/


Anonymous 09/27/2017 (Wed) 23:14:12 [Preview] No. 11395 del


Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 08:48:05 [Preview] No. 11397 del
>>11377
>unless they spread Jammers through the country or remove every single hardware
They could also cut the power. In this case, the device should have a solar powered battery...


Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 10:05:35 [Preview] No. 11398 del
ardunel dongle


Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 13:39:36 [Preview] No. 11404 del
Wifi is a really bad idea for a large-scale mesh. High latencies, interference resulting in speed drops, power hog, jewish microwaves. On the other hand, all high-speed wired solutions have no libre firmware or drivers. Everything above 1Gbit or optical is fucking proprietary. But at least optical wires don't radiate shit in all directions so CIA niggers can't find them easily.



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Improving software and security Anonymous 08/11/2017 (Fri) 20:29:06 [Preview] No. 10688 [Reply] [Last 50 Posts]
Hello my good fellows!

It is evident that the majority of mainstream software programs are shit, and while audits and the creators of a specific software program can tell one much about the quality of said software, audits can be fabricated and the user should look at the program itself instead of looking at who made it and where it came from. If more individuals studied computer engineering/science and programming and were able to audit programs, we would become stronger, and one could rest assured that their computer was tested to perfection. I have begun to notice that a major problem with auditing code is the fact that some software programs are massive and require teams to finish in a practical amount of time (Or one individual with ultimate dedication...), and this can be fixed by advocating for single purpose programs with lean code and minimal features with room for the user to build and add to it. Computers are amazing machines, and every individual with a laptop and a great mind can achieve amazing feats! One could build a self driving car with the power of programming and advanced mathematics, one can program a self-learning AI that they can interact with, one can program drones or small satellites to take pictures of the earth and predict weather patterns, and the list goes on and on.
I am here to encourage you to begin making your own single purpose programs by yourself or with close friends and a passion to teach others about programming and auditing simple software programs. I don't believe there is a government plan to keep us all down and steal our data to destroy us, but your information is worth money, and data mining allows companies to look at the big picture and advertise products.

Free(Possibly) and open source software with a single defined purpose made as minimal as possible with space to allow for building onto it and improving it.
18 posts and 8 images omitted.


Anonymous 08/14/2017 (Mon) 21:48:40 [Preview] No. 10718 del
>>10714

If regular encryption is not dead, why every rich coutries use quantum computing to secure their com?


Anonymous 08/15/2017 (Tue) 02:50:32 [Preview] No. 10722 del
>>10718
""""""""""""""""""""""FUTURE PROOFING""""""""""""
(aka the lockmart strategy, buzzwords and vertical integration mixed with government contracts is an easy way to build wealth, i.e. stable investment or money laundering)


Anonymous 08/15/2017 (Tue) 04:10:59 [Preview] No. 10725 del
>>10718

You have no idea what you're talking about. Go read up on:

Public-key encryption
Symmetric encryption
The integer factorization problem
The discrete logarithm problem
Shor's algorithm
Grover's algorithm


Anonymous 09/27/2017 (Wed) 22:49:26 [Preview] No. 11393 del
> I don't believe there is a government plan to keep us all down and steal our data to destroy us
Yes it is, look at RSA encryption


Anonymous 09/28/2017 (Thu) 10:37:26 [Preview] No. 11401 del
>>10693
> people don't wanna even type "firefox"
I don't want to either, but it's for different reasons. Anyway the normies can do whatever they want, and we can do what we want.
> Even if some unusual surge in interest in the kind of programming you're talking about were to occur, the result would be tons of buggy, inefficient, incompatible implementations.
There doesn't have to be any big surge, and there won't be. That's because people have been brainwashed from a very young age to be consumer sheep. Only a very small minority have the interest in doing something different.
And yes, there will be incompatible implementations. So what? I'm not interested in the same hardware, OS, and languages that others here are. All that matters is that some fundamental protocols and standards are kept simple, so our individual implementations can also remain simple. That is the only critical part.