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Bernd 06/20/2019 (Thu) 23:32:19 [Preview] No. 27456
Name some idiomatic expressions from your language, give a literal translation and explain their meaning.

Cutucando onça com vara curta: "Poking a jaguar with a short stick". A reckless act.

Encher linguiça: "Filling sausages". Meaningless filler speech. Comparable to "padding out" or "beating around the bush".

Lei para inglês ver: "A law for Englishmen to see". In a strict sense this is the Feijó Law of November 7th 1831. It banned the slave trade but went completely unenforced, as it was passed only to appease Britain, which was pressuring the government to cease the import of Africans. Thus, at the time the law was said to be just for Englishmen to see, and the expression now applies to anything used only to maintain appearences. Comparable to "Potemkin village".

Tirar o cavalo da chuva: "Removing one's horse from the rain". A reference to 19th century etiquette: visitors left their horses exposed to the elements, expecting to leave quickly, but their hosts could offer to take their horses off the rain and leave them sheltered so they could spend more time. By some poorly understood semantic shift, this invitation came to mean giving up: you take your horse off the rain if you abandon some pretension.

A vaca foi pro brejo: "The cow went to the bog". A situation greatly worsened.

Dar nome aos bois: "Naming the oxen". Denouncing those involved in something, typically negative, or saying something important.

Boi de piranha: "Piranha ox". Sacrificing something of lesser value to save something greater, allegedly from cattle barges throwing away an older bovine into piranha-infested waters to save the rest. For that we have a more easily understood expression, dar os dedos para não perder as mãos ("giving away the fingers to save the hands").

Queimar a rosca: "Burning the donut". Homosex. Bolsonaro famously replied this to a homosexual on Twitter.

Terminar em pizza: "Ending up in pizza". A problem which gets left unresolved and remains in status quo, often in the context of crime and impunity. Used a lot in political corruption scandals. Supposedly in the 60s a football team celebrated a deal ending internal troubles by eating pizza together.


Bernd 06/21/2019 (Fri) 00:23:57 [Preview] No.27458 del
Doing the 31 - masturbating

Wrecking the truck - wet dreams

crushing the mountains with your ass- being fat duh

throwing the shoe to the roof- during the ottoman times unapproved apprentices shoes was thrown to the roofs as sign as not being accepted. this is still used for falling out of favor.

monkey has opened its eyes- realizing the truth literally getting redpilled


Bernd 06/21/2019 (Fri) 12:12:35 [Preview] No.27472 del
hěnchī X. 很吃X "It eats X". It requires X. X is a personal skill or luck.
yěshì zuìle. 也是醉了. "I am also drunk". It's saying that the poor performance of the other guy makes the speaker drunk. Originated in mainland.
rénshè. 人設. "Character design". Originally a job in Japanese manga production. It meant to design a character's appearance and personality. Chinese industry appropriated the term for managing the tv stars' images.
xiǎoqī. 小七. "Little seven". The franchise convenience store.
bākù. 巴庫. Back. From Japanese from English.
Asobi. The gap between machine parts. From Japanese.
jiàn liè xīn xǐ. 見獵心喜. I really don't know what this means. I thought it means "getting excited when you see your hunting target or opponent's weakness". But on dictionary it says "recalling the good memory when you see someone doing things (hunting) you used to like". From Classical Chinese.
美國時間. "American time". Leisure time or available time. Used only in negative context "I don't have American time for this."

This are just off my head.


Bernd 06/21/2019 (Fri) 15:12:40 [Preview] No.27473 del
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Bernd 06/23/2019 (Sun) 07:02:57 [Preview] No.27510 del
Erry time I write something to /kc/ I always run into some idiom but now as I have to think of them I have a hard time recalling, and actual sayings are wanting to come up. Maybe those fit too.

itatja az egereket = give a drink to the mice; cries
én is azon járok = I walk on that too; when someone steps on your foot.
elhúzza a nótáját = to play his tune; beat someone up
benne van a pácban = he's in the marinade; he's in the trouble/fix, to be in the pickle
megy a lecsóba/levesbe = goes into the lecho/soup; it's done in the wrong way, failure, goes into the trash, will be thrown out, he/she/it dies

When peeps make an agreement to do something (liek drink a beer or do some kind of a work) but no actual plan is made, just generalities, they leave the decision to future occasion (depending on the level of relationship, it can imply it'll never happen):
- majd meglátjuk = we'll see
- a vak is azt mondta, azt mégse látta meg = said the blind as well, then he didn't

eb ura fakó = dog's master is dog (dog is the father of the dog); this was said by a Hungarian aristocrat, official, military commander after the Diet decided to dethrone the king in 1707, he said "dog's master is dog, Emperor Joseph isn't our king"; rarely this is used now without the actual context but I think I heard it last time when I was a kid
aki másnak vermet ás, maga esik bele = who digs a pit for someone will fall in it himself; I think this is self explanatory
bekanalaz = getting spooned in; in relation to the previous, this idiom means the one who stirs the shit a lot, he himself will be pulled into it by the spoon sooner or later
addig jár a korsó a kútra, míg el nem törik = the jug goes to the well until it breaks; someone does something regularly until he dun goofs


Bernd 06/24/2019 (Mon) 18:25:37 [Preview] No.27561 del
letesz valamit az asztalra = put something down onto the desk; having an achievement, used when boasting, or comparing oneself to others, or when you want other to shut up because you are the májer and he did nothing notable yet.
májer = major?; the best, the greatest, the boss etc.
nagy arcú = having a big face; someone who is boastful
bassza a csőrét = fucks somebody's beak; to be disturb by something
fingani a passzát szelet = to fart the passat wind

You know what's fucking my beak? That he plays the boss as if he had farted the passat wind. He should put something onto the table then he can have big face.


sage Bernd 06/24/2019 (Mon) 18:26:14 [Preview] No.27562 del
>>27561
*to be disturbed


Bernd 06/24/2019 (Mon) 18:28:08 [Preview] No.27563 del
>>27561
*fingani a passzát szelet = to fart the passat wind; to be the májer
fix'd that one too. And säging properly.


Bernd 06/24/2019 (Mon) 19:48:44 [Preview] No.27564 del
Conversa mole pra boi dormir: "Soft talk to put cattle to sleep". Meaningless speech or a cheap excuse.

Procurar pelo em ovo: "Searching for hair on an egg". Nitpicking, creating imaginary problems.

Santo de pau oco: "Hollow wood saint". A false individual. Allegedly hollow icons were used to smuggle gold and evade the Crown's meticulous fiscal oversight when precious metals were mined in the 18th century.

Lugar onde o vento faz a curva: "Where the wind makes a turn". A remote place.

Água que passarinho não bebe: "Water birds don't drink". Liquor.

Enxugar gelo: "Drying ice". Futile acts.


>>27458
>Doing the 31
The 3 represents the hand?

>>27561
>letesz valamit az asztalra = put something down onto the desk
We have botar o pau na mesa, "putting one's stick on the table", but it typically means truly asserting dominance and not just boasting. Apparently this has roots in slavery and the stick in question was the one used to discipline slaves. But nowadays it's assumed pau means "dick", so it'd be "putting one's dick on the table".
After some research I've found a great number of those idioms are also related to slavery.


Bernd 06/25/2019 (Tue) 05:24:56 [Preview] No.27573 del
>>27564
I had the notion to combine these idioms of different origin together and use them. In English. Sounds fun and confusing.

>Lugar onde o vento faz a curva: "Where the wind makes a turn". A remote place.
ahol a madár se jár = where even the bird doesn't go. A longer use of this: where do you thread where even the bird doesn't?
az Isten háta mögött = behind God's back. A faraway place.
az Isten háta mögött, a béka segge alatt = behind God's back, under the frog's ass. A far faraway place.

Not an easy answer to the origin of our idioms. And not an easy find. I know books exist about this. Now I have relatively easy access to newspapers of any age, I could look around sometimes.


Bernd 06/25/2019 (Tue) 10:29:41 [Preview] No.27579 del


Bernd 06/28/2019 (Fri) 10:27:20 [Preview] No.27632 del
In Britain and it's former colonies the expression "I won't pull the wool over your eyes" means "I won't try too fool you". There's a country (don't remember which) where they instead say "I'm not hanging noodles on your ears". Jag Bhalla wrote about this and many other idioms in his amusing book.
https://anonfiles.com/e2J7Rfwfnf/Bhalla_Jag_-_I_m_Not_Hanging_Noodles_on_Your_Ears_and_Other_Intriguing_Idioms_from_Around_the_World_mobi

P.S. There are free ebook readers for every mobile device. Check your app store.


Bernd 07/01/2019 (Mon) 05:32:43 [Preview] No.27749 del
One the Trudeau video made me remember of:
amit főztél, edd is meg = what you cooked, eat it too. You created the situation you're in, now suffer it through. There's a hint at the end that suffer it like a man but in most situation that layer of the meaning is dismissed and more of the gloating layer is the prevailing one.


Bernd 07/01/2019 (Mon) 10:39:19 [Preview] No.27753 del
傷弓之鳥
birds hurt by a bow fly higher when they hear strings
avoiding something because it was bad once


Bernd 07/01/2019 (Mon) 15:33:25 [Preview] No.27755 del
>>27753
That's an elegant sounding figure of speech.

>>27632
I amma notta anginga pasta onna yourra earsa, no?


Bernd 07/04/2019 (Thu) 01:07:38 [Preview] No.27823 del
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Vá catar coquinho: "Go pick up little coconuts". Piss off.

Nem que a vaca tussa: "Even if the cow coughs". Used for improbabilities and steadfast refusals.

Cão chupando manga: A double-layered idiom which translates literally to "Hound sucking on a mango". Cão, whose prosaic translation would be just "dog", is an euphemism for the devil, while "sucking on a mango" means "grimacing". The hidden layer is thus "Grimacing devil". I only found it's double-layered after doing some research, so most assume it's about dogs.
This means something or someone bizarre and repulsive. The idiom was restricted to the Northeast and later spread to the rest of the country. In its home region an idiom of equal meaning is cão de calçolão, "dog in panties".

Fazer nas coxas: "doing it on one's thighs". A sloppy job. Slave women used their thighs to mold roof tiles.

Rapadura é doce, mas não é mole não: "Rapadura is sweet but it ain't soft". Rapadura is essentially a solid brick of brown sugar, and, as you may expect, you can't simply bite into it. Good things require effort.

Quem não tem cão caça com gato: "A houndless hunter employs a cat". Improvisation.

Matar a cobra e mostrar o pau: "Killing the snake and showing off the stick". Making a statement and conclusively proving it.

Casa-da-mãe-joana: "Mother Joana's home". A lawless, chaotic place or situation. Named after Joanna I of Naples (1326/27 - 1382).

>>27573
For a remote place we also have Onde Judas perdeu as botas ("where Judas lost his boots"). "To lose one's boots" is an euphemism for death. Besides idioms we have cafundó, a word of African origin specifically remote place. A variation is cafundó do Judas.


Bernd 07/04/2019 (Thu) 01:09:11 [Preview] No.27824 del
specifically for remote places


Bernd 07/04/2019 (Thu) 10:01:17 [Preview] No.27833 del
>>27823
>cão de calçolão, "dog in panties".


Bernd 07/04/2019 (Thu) 17:22:02 [Preview] No.27839 del
>>27823
Impressing how local features, history, social structures, flora and fauna leave their mark on the formation of these idioms.
>Joanna I of Naples
How our countries are joined by the twisting twines of history.


Bernd 07/17/2019 (Wed) 21:05:06 [Preview] No.28065 del
szarkavarás = shitstirring; causing problems to others, usually done by in a "covert" way liek talking behind someones back


Bernd 07/20/2019 (Sat) 11:37:27 [Preview] No.28113 del
It's not really an idiom, rather case of an interesting way of creating a word.
magyaráz = making it Hungarian (I'm not sure how to translate it literally properly); translates to explain.


Bernd 07/26/2019 (Fri) 10:19:01 [Preview] No.28216 del
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[i]Weder Fisch noch Vogel sein[/i] "To be neither fish nor bird" Making odd compromises or being indistinct
[i]Eulen nach Athen tragen[/i] "To carry owls to Athens" Useless and redundant activity
[i]Jemanden ins Pfefferland wünschen[/i] "To wish someone moved to pepper land" If you want someone to disappear or move far away (probably because India "pepper land" was one of the most distant regions people would think about)
[i]Die Flinte ins Korn werfen[/i] "To toss the musket into the grain field" To give up (soldiers who go AWOL are faster without musket)


Bernd 07/26/2019 (Fri) 19:24:23 [Preview] No.28250 del
>>28216
huh polish equivalents of some of those are very similar

wozić drewno do lasu - To carry wood to the forest
uciekać gdzie pieprz rośnie - To run away where pepper grows


Bernd 07/28/2019 (Sun) 17:29:14 [Preview] No.28306 del
>>28283
funny coming from a nation of nordic larpers


Bernd 07/31/2019 (Wed) 22:07:01 [Preview] No.28371 del
Quebrar um galho: "breaking a branch". Providing aid, solving a problem. Exists in noun form as quebra-galho. Likely from African paganism.

Cão que ladra não morde: "a barking dog doesn't bite". Used for boastful people who make empty threats.


Bernd 08/02/2019 (Fri) 05:25:52 [Preview] No.28391 del
>>28371
amelyik kutya ugat, az nem harap = Cão que ladra não morde; literally


Bernd 08/02/2019 (Fri) 10:41:02 [Preview] No.28393 del
>>28371
>>28371
>a barking dog doesn't bite
we have the sames


Bernd 08/03/2019 (Sat) 21:39:05 [Preview] No.28417 del
>>28391
>>28393
Didn't think that one would be universal.


Bernd 08/06/2019 (Tue) 07:06:12 [Preview] No.28491 del
>>28371
Another one in the same vein as the second one is "carroça vazia faz muito barulho" = "an empty wagon makes a lot of noise."


Bernd 08/06/2019 (Tue) 12:07:27 [Preview] No.28492 del
>>28491
There is the same proverb in Armenian.
Interesting to note, many other European languages have a similar proverb about barrels.


Bernd 08/06/2019 (Tue) 15:27:51 [Preview] No.28493 del
>>28492
Barrels?
Such as?


Bernd 08/10/2019 (Sat) 12:09:52 [Preview] No.28565 del
>>27823
>Quem não tem cão caça com gato
I've heard it was originally
"Quem não tem cão caça COMO gato"
Meaning "A houndless hunter hunts like a cat", as in, stalks his prey, which makes more sense to me.


Bernd 08/10/2019 (Sat) 12:31:14 [Preview] No.28566 del
>>28565
What everyday context can be that used as an idiom?


Bernd 08/10/2019 (Sat) 12:37:08 [Preview] No.28567 del
>>28566
It's used when you need to improvise. When you need to o something but don't have all the means/tools for example.


Bernd 09/30/2019 (Mon) 01:35:59 [Preview] No.29427 del
O olho do dono é o que engorda a vaca: "the owner's eye is what fattens the cow". Business proverb: profit only comes with intense managerial effort.


Bernd 09/30/2019 (Mon) 05:36:49 [Preview] No.29432 del
>>29427
That's a nice melodic sentence.

Le van törve. - "He/she is broken (down)". Sad.
Complimented with a metaphor: Le van törve, mint a bili füle - "Broken (down) like the handle of the chamberpot".


Bernd 11/12/2019 (Tue) 22:21:10 [Preview] No.31618 del
szarkavaró - shit stirrer. A person who stirs shit, making trouble for others.
See also: bekanalaz >>27510


Bernd 11/13/2019 (Wed) 01:26:45 [Preview] No.31625 del
Boiar/viajar na maionese: "floating in mayonnaise". Being distracted and/or detached from reality. Devised in prisons in Rio de Janeiro in the 70s as a replacement for escorregar no quiabo ("slipping in okra"), which had a similar meaning but came to be used for prisoners who made effeminate gaffes.


Bernd 11/13/2019 (Wed) 20:26:39 [Preview] No.31828 del
"N'è falendi l'aria" lit. "The air is falling", when it's raining a lot
"Ni fai falà la mazza" lit. "You make my stomach fall", when someone is annoying you
"Piddhanni capu" lit. "to take the head", to understand something which implicitly is not easy
"Mancu a carri macinata" lit. "not even as minced meat", when someone/something is of the worst quality possible
"No v'è vessu" lit. "there is no direction/way", basically means impossible
"Andà come la pulvara/fà l'isciuta di la pulvara" lit. "to go like the dust/to get out like the dust", to go to ruins, to vanish, used in the imperative to mean "get out of my face"
"Anda e fatti un brodu" lit. "go and make yourself a broth", used in the imperative typically when someone is saying something you find preposterous/ridiculous


Bernd 11/13/2019 (Wed) 21:15:15 [Preview] No.31863 del
>>31828
>"N'è falendi l'aria"
We have the "sky is falling down /tearing" tear as rip and not tear as eyewater = (le)szakad az ég or égszakadás.
>"Anda e fatti un brodu"
If something has to be discarded due it's unnecessary or bad, or turned to useless, died etc., we say "goes into the soup/lecho" = megy a levesbe/lecsóba


Bernd 11/13/2019 (Wed) 22:01:18 [Preview] No.31882 del
>>31828
Don't let people think you're using standard italian.


Bernd 11/16/2019 (Sat) 15:57:22 [Preview] No.32257 del
Баба с возу - кобыле легче. "A female out of cart - [its] easier for the [female] horse."

basically its an ancient way to say "fuck off normies" and its only used in female variant or towards females (but has more general meaning).


Bernd 11/16/2019 (Sat) 21:25:10 [Preview] No.32293 del
>>32257
>basically its an ancient way to say "fuck off normies"

It's more like "oh, then fuck off, we'll be better without you".


Bernd 11/16/2019 (Sat) 21:43:44 [Preview] No.32296 del
>>32293
it can be used as in "good riddance", but here its more complex than just that

for example theres only female version of this idiom (and its normally used in somewhat female context, although rarely can be used for males too but normally shouldn't) and actually the female here that gets fuck-offed is an archetype for a normie or some useless retard (a ballast that makes the horse's life (and everyone's else) needlessly more complicated and increase hardship) (all females are normies especially the rural ones where its more endemic)

the female there is a kein bernd if you like, everyone is happy when it goes back to facebook even the horse


Bernd 11/16/2019 (Sat) 23:56:18 [Preview] No.32301 del
>>32296
Why does the horse have to be female? Is it like "this is kind of a 'girls' night' we're having, but between that girl and the horse the horse is actually invited"?


Bernd 11/17/2019 (Sun) 00:05:47 [Preview] No.32302 del
>>32301
no, the horse is actually 'female' because such was the word choice
i wanted to add a remark/explain this but i thought it would be too autistic or confusing

the fact that the horse is 'female' doesn't add any special sense or meaning to it but for some reason its a female horse

there are 3 kinds of horses
кобыла - female horse
конь - male horse
лошадь - any horse

for some reason they choose 'кобыла' (female horse), its not even that common because usually we call a random horse - 'лошадь' (any horse)


Bernd 11/17/2019 (Sun) 17:16:26 [Preview] No.32369 del
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>>32257
>>32293
Oh I get it.
"Get out of the coach/cart - it will be easier for the horse to pull - the coach/cart will run easier/better"

>>32301
The word for the horse in the idiom is a mare.

>>32302
кобыла - mare
конь - stallion
лошадь - horse


Bernd 11/17/2019 (Sun) 19:10:34 [Preview] No.32374 del
>>32257
Poland has the same - "Baba z wozu, koniom lżej"


Bernd 12/08/2019 (Sun) 15:54:47 [Preview] No.32934 del
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aranyköpés = golden spit; a funny saying, sometimes pseudo-wise (sometimes intentionally to make it funny), a wisecrack. At times unintentional, the one who says it does not aware of the humorous side of it, due to naivety (like children) or stupidity.


Bernd 12/08/2019 (Sun) 20:29:45 [Preview] No.32940 del
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"Хоть горшком назови, только в печь не ставь" - even call me a pot, just don't put me in oven.

That means that words matter much less than actions.


Bernd 12/08/2019 (Sun) 21:40:59 [Preview] No.32943 del
>>32940
Elegant.


Bernd 12/09/2019 (Mon) 14:48:54 [Preview] No.32964 del
>sataa kuin Esterin perseestä
"It rains as if from Esteri's asshole"
It rains very heavily. Esteri is a woman's name and probably implies and older woman, but it's hard to say with such an old idiom.
I think Finnish has a lot of these pretty weak idioms where you just add dirty ideas to everyday occurrences, instead of saying something clever or timely. I'm pretty bored with them so I haven't developed a good memory for such things.

But then we also have words like "a reindeer's pissening" which is just the measure of land for how far reindeer will walk between two piss-breaks.


Bernd 12/09/2019 (Mon) 16:40:04 [Preview] No.32966 del
>>32964
>a reindeer's pissening
>how far reindeer will walk between two piss-breaks.
Would fit right in the imperial system.


Bernd 01/25/2020 (Sat) 07:48:50 [Preview] No.34241 del
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Conscripted military service is a thing of the past (there's always some talk to bring it back) so military slang is less relevant, younger generations hear expressions which were born in the military and were implanted and inherited during service, less and less, probably not at all. But back then when a large proportion of the society spent some mandatory time in the military these idioms sipped into civilian life too. Maybe I'll list more in the future, right now only have time for a couple.
centit vágni or vágom a centit = "cutting the centimeter", "I'm cutting the centimeter"; waiting for the end of something, in the military typically the end of service. This isn't a figure of speech, they bought tailor's measuring tape (back than it was paper based I think, now I could only find images of plastic) and every day passed they cut one centimeter of it, then on the last day they used as confetti.
kopasz = "bald/baldie"; fresh conscript, those in still basic training, maybe longer, depending on the length of service. The lowest in the ranks.
fóka, fókázni = "seal" (the animal), "doing the seal"; mop and mopping. This served as both cleaning purposes and bullying the baldies. Longer serving soldiers spilled soap foam all over the barracks by the buckets and on the basis of seniority demanded the baldies to clean it up. The cleaning went with a piece of flat wood wrapped in a rag, this was called "seal", and the crawling around on four and cleaning is the "doing the seal".
motoros fóka = "motorized seal". Senior conscript were done with doing the seal they could use more advanced tools, flat peace of wood with long wooden handle (they could use proper mop basically), so they didn't have to crawl on four.


Bernd 01/26/2020 (Sun) 17:44:40 [Preview] No.34271 del
I want to ask to the hues, how is Xiiiiiiii pronounced?


Bernd 01/26/2020 (Sun) 21:48:18 [Preview] No.34280 del
>>34271
That x at the beginning of the syllable is the same phoneme as ch (chamada, chapéu). The rest of the expression is just a matter of emphasis and intonation. Context and the ellipsis it's invariably paired with mean you'll fade out as you progress among the is.


Bernd 01/28/2020 (Tue) 23:29:25 [Preview] No.34327 del
>>34241

Conscription is a big thing here, especially when you want to avoid it, because army sometimes looks like prison here (although this isn't always that bad).

>kopasz = "bald/baldie"; fresh conscript

There is a pretty strict hierarchy, although it is changed when 2 years of conscription reduced to one, but it still works, and everyone know this hierarchy, even those who didn't experience army at all. It is dukh (spirit, smell) -> cherpak (dipper) -> ded (grandpa) -> dembel (demobilized), going by time of service. Some variation exists with intermediate rankings, but last two are required. Term "dedovschina" ("rule of deds") is used very often and has negative connection with army. For example, "ded" rarely does any cleaning work or something like this.

There also a large amount of army idiomatic expressions, mostly about stupidness of rules and stupidness of officers. For specific reason. army command thinks that free conscript is dangerous person, for outsiders and himself, so conscript always does some work to be tired. That works is often very stupid, from making square snowbanks, painting the grass in green (especially when high command visits) etc.
It is hard to write all these expressions, there are many, and they also often untranslatable because they contain wordplay to show low intelligence and bad style of commanding officers. Like "dig trench from fence to the dinner" ("to/until"), "you living like pigs in bear lair" ("pig" means dirty person), "soldier, your boots is your face" (about cleanliness of uniform), and many more.


Bernd 01/29/2020 (Wed) 20:19:33 [Preview] No.34345 del
>>34327
Was similar here. It was abolished before my turn to vacuumed in, but had relatives and pals who were conscripts and told a few anecdotes. Also read two "army reports" (of a blogger and a reader of his) which were full accounts of their time in the Defence Force, kind of a memoirs.
After WWII when the People's Army was organized three years were service at least for two decades maybe for 25 years. Then it was reduced to two years. Then 1.5 probably after the regime change then 1, then to 6 months. Was abolished around 2002-03 I think. There's always some talk to bring it back but nothing that can be taken seriously.
It could be useful. One could learn (beside how to handle a gun) teamwork, responsibility for oneself and for others, order, discipline, leadership skills, handling unexpected situations and some more, even a trade (like mechanic, accounting, chef, etc.) if it was properly done. But never ever had been done properly, so mostly it was a waste of time and unnecessary stress which quite a few can't bear and quit via self-headshot during standing on guard with live rounds in their mags.
Yeah, doing empty, useless and meaningless work is very typical and our soldiers too created their idioms: "clean this window until you see to home / until you see the horse on the roof", "this is the Hungarian Defense Force, we carry what is round and roll what is square". Ofc these seemingly pointless exercises do serve a purpose, they train soldiers to execute orders which might seem nonsensical to them, instead of questioning and hesitating. On the field, where orders come on the radio, and no time for explanations, and the soldiers shouldn't even know the background info which led to the decision upstairs, it is very useful.


Bernd 01/29/2020 (Wed) 20:35:32 [Preview] No.34350 del
>>34327
Conscripts were divided into three orders:
kopasz = bald, whom we already met.
gumi = rubber, in the midterm, I read somewhere that they could held the ends of their trousers to their boots with a rubber band, instead of tucking them into the boots, and this is the origin of the term, but basically it meant they could get away with some liberties. Mostly they were those who bullied the baldies.
öreg = old, in third term, waiting to be discharged. They didn't give a shit anymore.

The military university published a collection of the military slang. The author even wrote a little study about the topic, how the slang originates and differs from the jargon, how the words were created or where were they loaned from, etc. Throughout the whole dictionary he points out the wordplays and gives longer examples for the context.
I give the link even tho one needs to know Hungarian ofc, but it can serve as illustration.
http://mnytud.arts.klte.hu/sorozat/katszl/index.html
For the unexpected Hungarian visitors I upload the pdf maybe someone will be interested.


Bernd 01/30/2020 (Thu) 20:41:36 [Preview] No.34381 del
>>34350
I'm thinking of collecting a couple of expressions which I could present in a meaningful way (not based on wordplay etc). Good example:
aladin = Aladdin; the soldier in the upper bunk at the door who is the closest to the switch of the magic lamp, and whose job is to turn off the light at sack time.


Bernd 03/10/2020 (Tue) 08:57:06 [Preview] No.35008 del
This entire book is all about strange idioms from around the world. The zip file contains epub, mobi & pdf versions.


Bernd 03/10/2020 (Tue) 21:30:35 [Preview] No.35035 del
>>35008

Russian part is mostly correct, although there are small inaccuracies. Like "white crow" is not "a rare find", but mostly about person who is too different from others, often slightly negative. Like "black sheep". And "led to white knee" is wrongly translated, original is "white heating" (like overheat metal), that form of "heat" sounds almost like "knee" - (до) каления / колена.


Bernd 03/11/2020 (Wed) 20:01:18 [Preview] No.35053 del
>>35008
No Hungarian. Who would have thought.

Huh I totally forgot about this: >>34350
gempa, kotu = every meal served in the Hungarian Defense Force. It's gibberish but if I really wanna translate it, it means dirt. Something awful and disgusting.
Typical use:
- What's for lunch today?
- Gempa with kotu.
- And tomorrow?
- Kotu with gempa.


Bernd 03/12/2020 (Thu) 19:04:36 [Preview] No.35075 del
>>35008
Not a lot here.
>Guests always give pleasure—when they arrive or when they leave
I know this one.


Bernd 04/09/2020 (Thu) 11:28:32 [Preview] No.35751 del
Catalan;
somiatruites "omelet dreamer". To be distracted
Menjar poc i pair bé "to not eat a lot to digest well". Meaning to take your time
Pagant, St Pere canta "If you pay, Saint Pere sings". You can achieve anything you want with money
Ja has begut oli "You've already drank oil" Meaning that you have already fucked up. The meaning of this expression comes from one of the torture methods the inquisition used, using a funnel to make the victim drink boiling oil untill he or she died.
Venir de l'hort "Coming from the fields". Meaning to not know what's happening
Fer-se un Sant Hilari "To do a Sant Hilari". To drink all of the bottle without stopping.
vesteix un bastó i semblarà un senyor "he dresses with a walking stick and looks like a sir" meaning that even though he may pretend he is still the same inside.
ja estem al cap del carrer "We reached the end of the street". To arrive at a conclusion
eren set que l'aguantàven i encara pixava tor "although seven people are holding (his dick) he keeps not being able to pee straight" To not be able to do a thing even though you have help.
Tants caps tants barrets "As many hats as heads" Quoting the epic meme, to be perfectly balanced.
De pasta de moniato "to be made from sweet potatoes paste" To be distracted
Anar a can Felip "To go to Felip's house" To go to the toilet. The expression probably comes from the War of the Spanish Succession where most catalans were for Charles VI and fought against castile.
A cavall regalat, no li miris el dentat "Do not look at the teeth of a horse that is gifted" To not critizise a thing that is gifted.
s'ha begut l'enteniment "he has drank his own intellect" / faltar-li dos dits de front "he is missing two fingers from the front" to act crazy
Trempera matinera, no és trempera verdadera, sinó trempera de pixera "The erection from the morning isn't a real one, it's for peeing" no meaning behind this one it's just a common saying.
Bufar i fer ampolles "to blow and to make bottles" something that is really easy.
Menja't una cama "Eat one of your legs". Typical joke reply for when kids say they are hungry (tinc gana) since it rhymes.
Com mes cosíns, mes endins "the more cousins the more inside (the dick)" Just a common saying


Bernd 04/09/2020 (Thu) 11:31:25 [Preview] No.35752 del
Re-posting it but whit spaces between them for more easy reading
Catalan;

somiatruites "omelet dreamer". To be distracted

Menjar poc i pair bé "to not eat a lot to digest well". Meaning to take your time

Pagant, St Pere canta "If you pay, Saint Pere sings". You can achieve anything you want with money

Ja has begut oli "You've already drank oil" Meaning that you have already fucked up. The meaning of this expression comes from one of the torture methods the inquisition used, using a funnel to make the victim drink boiling oil untill he or she died.

Venir de l'hort "Coming from the fields". Meaning to not know what's happening

Fer-se un Sant Hilari "To do a Sant Hilari". To drink all of the bottle without stopping.

vesteix un bastó i semblarà un senyor "he dresses with a walking stick and looks like a sir" meaning that even though he may pretend he is still the same inside.

ja estem al cap del carrer "We reached the end of the street". To arrive at a conclusion

eren set que l'aguantàven i encara pixava tor "although seven people are holding (his dick) he keeps not being able to pee straight" To not be able to do a thing even though you have help.

Tants caps tants barrets "As many hats as heads" Quoting the epic meme, to be perfectly balanced.

De pasta de moniato "to be made from sweet potatoes paste" To be distracted

Anar a can Felip "To go to Felip's house" To go to the toilet. The expression probably comes from the War of the Spanish Succession where most catalans were for Charles VI and fought against castile.

A cavall regalat, no li miris el dentat "Do not look at the teeth of a horse that is gifted" To not critizise a thing that is gifted.

s'ha begut l'enteniment "he has drank his own intellect" / faltar-li dos dits de front "he is missing two fingers from the front" to act crazy

Trempera matinera, no és trempera verdadera, sinó trempera de pixera "The erection from the morning isn't a real one, it's for peeing" no meaning behind this one it's just a common saying.

Bufar i fer ampolles "to blow and to make bottles" something that is really easy.

Menja't una cama "Eat one of your legs". Typical joke reply for when kids say they are hungry (tinc gana) since it rhymes.

Com mes cosíns, mes endins "the more cousins the more inside (the dick)" Just a common saying


Bernd 04/09/2020 (Thu) 14:24:08 [Preview] No.35756 del
>>35751
>>35752
Who is Saint Hilari?
>A cavall regalat, no li miris el dentat
Sames here.


Bernd 04/09/2020 (Thu) 14:38:47 [Preview] No.35757 del
>>35756
>Saint Hilari
Don't know, but I found this https://ca.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sant_Hilari (it's not in english but here's the hungarian page https://hu.wikipedia.org/wiki/Szent_Hil%C3%A1r_(egy%C3%A9rtelm%C5%B1s%C3%ADt%C5%91_lap) )
>Sames here.
Yeah, I've also heard it in spanish guess it's a common phrase arround european languages


Bernd 04/09/2020 (Thu) 14:58:19 [Preview] No.35758 del
>>35756
>>35757
It's also in English.


Bernd 04/09/2020 (Thu) 15:18:44 [Preview] No.35759 del
(37.41 KB 261x407 patron-saint.jpg)
>>35757
Sadly no answer in those articles. Hoped for performing some miracle, or being a drunk (tho one needs to perform lots of miracles to counterbalance drunkness if one aspires to sainthood), or tortured to death with lots of water (similar to that oil torture you mentioned).
Found something else. It's unofficial, but why not.


Bernd 04/10/2020 (Fri) 04:24:19 [Preview] No.35794 del
Chutar o pau da barraca: "To kick the camp tent's pole". To lose one's temper.

Dar o braço a torcer: "To give one's arm up to have it twisted". To admit one's incorrectness. Frequently used in the negative to describe obstinate people.


>>35752
Catalan sounds weird. Oftentimes I can see how a word is related but only after being given a translation.
>A cavall regalat, no li miris el dentat
This one is universal. Cavalo dado não se olha os dentes.


Bernd 04/10/2020 (Fri) 07:43:48 [Preview] No.35801 del
>>35794
>Chutar o pau da barraca
Kek, I like that.


Bernd 04/11/2020 (Sat) 18:52:31 [Preview] No.35839 del
>>35794
Yeah there are some words that are more similar in portugesee than castilian.


Bernd 05/15/2020 (Fri) 21:25:01 [Preview] No.36756 del
(43.51 KB 750x499 fagyi_visszanyal.jpg)
ráfázik = to be cold onto ("he is cold onto", "he was cold onto", "he feels/felt cold onto"). Wooo, hard to translate, the meaning is to suffer the consequence for one's own action, taking a knock. It has quite a few variation, ráfarag (to carve onto), ráfizet (to pay onto), rábaszik (to fuck onto).
a fagyi visszanyal - the icecream licks back. Similar to the above, but has the implication of payback. It's more karmic.
For example, one can be cold onto when doing something illegal and get caught by the police, also one can torment a cat but it scratches its tormentor. From these two situations only for the second can the "icecream licks back" be used.


Bernd 05/17/2020 (Sun) 02:49:57 [Preview] No.36781 del
>>36756
The English phrasal verb 'to upend' is a better analogy.
anyway you are bad and you should feel bad for spreading our language
you also use the term karma
karma comes from India which means it's a gypsy term
you are a gypsy
you are the worst thing that has ever happened to endchan
Hungarians shouldn't feel good about themselves
only suffering Hungarians are real Hungarians
this is even worse than when you talked about the Hungarian word 'szerszám' being special
must be a STEMcel
I know that the humanities were murdered in this country decades ago. But still man, cringe.


Bernd 05/17/2020 (Sun) 02:51:17 [Preview] No.36782 del
or oh God, what if you're not even a STEMcel but a... gasp worker!


Bernd 05/17/2020 (Sun) 06:44:11 [Preview] No.36785 del
>>36781
I'm not sure you are being serious.
On one hand you write a load of bollocks, memes:
>karma comes from India which means it's a gypsy term
>Hungarians shouldn't feel good about themselves
>only suffering Hungarians are real Hungarians
On the other you appear to be arguing which means you want to be taken seriusly:
>The English phrasal verb 'to upend' is a better analogy.
>szerszám is not special
And not to mention the name calling and ad hominems you are directing toward me. This also begs the question why do you even come back if you can't stand me?
So all in all I think you just memeing here.


Bernd 05/17/2020 (Sun) 20:41:27 [Preview] No.36803 del
>>36756
>>36756
haha this pic is so random and funny. Did you make it Hungarybernd?


Bernd 05/17/2020 (Sun) 21:03:35 [Preview] No.36806 del
>>36785
I'm mentally ill bro.
I only noticed it just now that it's an idiomatic expression thread.
But it's still bad.
Sometimes I want all other Hungarians dead so I can personify our unique suffering incarnate.


Bernd 05/18/2020 (Mon) 05:37:27 [Preview] No.36811 del
>>36803
No. Found it on internets.

>>36806
At 4:50 Sunday, I thought you were drunk. Which is very likely. Beside depressed.
The Hungarian is a sanguine nation, not melancholic. Magyar tűz, szalmaláng (= Hungarian fire, flames of hay). Deep emotions, but passing fast, and changing. But since these are strong emotions it is easy to believe they are the standard.


Bernd 05/25/2020 (Mon) 06:58:18 [Preview] No.36944 del
>>35752
How could I forget the most used one!

-No hi han moros a la costa "There are no moors in the coasr"; comes from the reconquista and the moor raids, it means that ceirtan place is free from unwanted agents


Bernd 05/26/2020 (Tue) 11:22:36 [Preview] No.36979 del
Slovo za slovo, huem po stolu - word for word, dick hit the table

Used to describe the escalation of a conflict, namely the transition from verbal disagreement to physical


Bernd 05/31/2020 (Sun) 18:15:51 [Preview] No.37083 del
üvölt/ordít, mint a fába szorult féreg = cries like the vermin stuck in the wood; when someone screams very loudly, usually unnecessary. The vermin (= féreg) in question is a wolf, the wood is a certain type of trap, which if catches a wolf, that would probably howl very loud.
farkasordító hideg = wolf screaming cold; very cold
farkastörvény = wolf law; basically lawlessness, might makes right.
farkaséhes = wolf hungry; hungry like a wolf, very hungry
farkasétvágy = wolf appetite; sames
Also the common name for nyctalopia is farkasvakság = wolf blindness.



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